Understanding cell-cell interactions for biological aggregation: Working at the interface between engineering and biology

Condensed Matter lunchtime seminar

Understanding cell-cell interactions for biological aggregation: Working at the interface between engineering and biology

  • Event time: 1:00pm
  • Event date: 26th February 2007
  • Speaker: Catherine Biggs (Sheffield)
  • Location: Room 2511,

Event details

Cell-cell interactions are fundamental to all biological processes with many microorganisms surviving in populations either adherent to surfaces (biofilms) or each other (aggregates). The formation of biofilms/aggregates can be both beneficial (e.g. wastewater treatment, bioremediation) or detrimental (e.g. biofouling of surgical implants). Often however, biological aggregation is independently studied either from a biological or engineering/physical point of view with very little interaction. In order to create a step change in our understanding of aggregation it is necessary to work directly at the physical/life sciences interface. By combining engineering techniques (e.g. particle characterisation, aggregation studies) and biological analysis I will discuss how we discovered that microorganisms are not passive in the aggregation process and that colloidal sciences can add value to microbiological understanding.

This is a weekly series of informal talks given primarily by members of the soft condensed matter and statistical mechanics groups, but is also open to members of other groups and external visitors. The aim of the series is to promote discussion and learning of various topics at a level suitable to the broad background of the group. Everyone is welcome to attend..

Find out more about Condensed Matter lunchtime seminars.