Complex molecules at interfaces - insights from simulation

Condensed Matter lunchtime seminar

Complex molecules at interfaces - insights from simulation

  • Event time: 1:00pm
  • Event date: 2nd September 2013
  • Speaker: David Cheung (University of Strathclyde)
  • Location: Room 2511,

Event details

The behaviour of complex molecules, such as nanoparticles, polymers, and proteins at liquid interfaces is of increasing importance in a number of areas of science and technology. It has long been recognised that solid particles adhere to liquid interfaces, which provides a convenient method for the preparation of nanoparticle structures or to modify interfacial properties. The adhesion of proteins at liquid interfaces is important in many biological processes and in a number of materials applications of biomolecules. As the reduced dimensions of these particles makes experimental investigation challenging, molecular simulations provide a natural means for the study of these systems. In this talk I will describe some of my recent research on the study nanoparticles [1,2], proteins [3], and polymers [4] at liquid interfaces using molecular simulation. In particular I will discuss the role of microscopic effects such as capillary waves in the effective interaction between a nanoparticle and a fluid interface, how the stablity of nanoparticles and proteins at liquid interfaces depends on their surface structure and conformation and stability of functionalised dendrimers at liquid interfaces.

[1] DL Cheung and SAF Bon, Phys. Rev. Lett., 102, 066103 (2009) [1] DL Cheung and SAF Bon, Soft Matter, 5, 3969 (2009) [3] DL Cheung, Langmuir, 28, 8730 (2012) [4] DL Cheung and P Carbone, Soft Matter, in press

This is a weekly series of informal talks given primarily by members of the soft condensed matter and statistical mechanics groups, but is also open to members of other groups and external visitors. The aim of the series is to promote discussion and learning of various topics at a level suitable to the broad background of the group. Everyone is welcome to attend..

Find out more about Condensed Matter lunchtime seminars.