Coarse-grained simulations of DNA nanostructures, the self-assembly of virus-like objects, and the evolution of protein complexes

Condensed Matter lunchtime seminar

Coarse-grained simulations of DNA nanostructures, the self-assembly of virus-like objects, and the evolution of protein complexes

  • Event time: 1:00pm
  • Event date: 31st May 2010
  • Speaker: Jon Doye (Oxford University)
  • Location: Room 2511,

Event details

DNA is an ideal material for nanoengineering because the specificity of the Watson-Crick base pairing allows the interactions between different strands to be controlled through their sequences, and DNA has been used to create an impressive variety of nanostructures and nanodevices. It is unfeasible to model the self-assembly of these nanostructures and the action of the nanodevices using atomistic simulations. We have therefore developed a coarse-grained model of DNA that can accurately reproduce the basic structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of single-stranded and duplex DNA. We have used this model to simulate the self-assembly of a DNA tetrahedron, the action of DNA tweezers and a DNA walker, and the formation mechanism of cruciform DNA. If time allows, I will also provide a brief overview of our work on patchy particles, and their applications to study the self-assembly of monodisperse objects, the evolution of protein complexes and the (quasi)crystallization of patchy colloids.

This is a weekly series of informal talks given primarily by members of the soft condensed matter and statistical mechanics groups, but is also open to members of other groups and external visitors. The aim of the series is to promote discussion and learning of various topics at a level suitable to the broad background of the group. Everyone is welcome to attend..

Find out more about Condensed Matter lunchtime seminars.