Self-propulsion of swimmers driven by chemical reactions: mesoscopic modelling of a synthetic biological system

Condensed Matter lunchtime seminar

Self-propulsion of swimmers driven by chemical reactions: mesoscopic modelling of a synthetic biological system

  • Event time: 1:00pm
  • Event date: 28th November 2016
  • Speaker: Tannie Liverpool (University of Bristol)
  • Location: Room 2511,

Event details

Synthetic biology is a new field that involves the design and construction of new biological parts, devices, and systems, as well as the re-design of existing, biological systems for useful purposes. Predictive mathematical models form an intrinsic part of the design and testing of these novel synthetic biological systems. I will describe and summarise recent theoretical work characterising the behaviour of a recently much studied example of a synthetic biological system, self-propelled micron scaled synthetic colloids which are driven by a non-uniform catalytic coating on their surface. I will discuss the (i) underlying physical mechanisms behind their propulsion, (ii) the effects of walls and boundaries on their motion, (iii) how the shapes of such active colloids affects their swimming efficiency and (iv) highlight some of the issues raised in quantitatively describing their collective behaviour.

About Condensed Matter lunchtime seminars

This is a weekly series of informal talks given primarily by members of the soft condensed matter and statistical mechanics groups, but is also open to members of other groups and external visitors. The aim of the series is to promote discussion and learning of various topics at a level suitable to the broad background of the group. Everyone is welcome to attend..

Find out more about Condensed Matter lunchtime seminars.