Effects of phenotypic delay on the evolution of drug resistance and the Luria-Delbrück distribution

Condensed Matter lunchtime seminar

Effects of phenotypic delay on the evolution of drug resistance and the Luria-Delbrück distribution

Event details

Spontaneous mutations that lead to drug resistance are a critical problem in the treatment of both infectious diseases and cancer. Typically, statistical physics and population genetics models assume that mutations have an immediate effect. However, it was recently observed that the evolution of resistance to multiple antibiotics in bacteria experiences a phenotypic delay, i.e., resistance only emerges three to four generations after the genetic mutation. I will talk about our theoretical and computational work on the effect of different mechanisms that can lead to phenotypic delay in the evolution of resistance, including changes in the underlying Luria-Delbrück distribution.

About Condensed Matter lunchtime seminars

This is a weekly series of informal talks given primarily by members of the soft condensed matter and statistical mechanics groups, but is also open to members of other groups and external visitors. The aim of the series is to promote discussion and learning of various topics at a level suitable to the broad background of the group. Everyone is welcome to attend..

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